Looking Back, Looking Forward

As I write this, it’s the end of November. Already. And that means that the new year (yes, 2022) is just around the corner.

This makes it the ideal time to start thinking about the year theme for the year to come.

What is a year theme? I explore the topic more in this blog, but as a refresher, a year theme is an idea or direction for the year ahead. It can be a word or a phrase. It is something that indicates where you want your year to go.

For 2021, my theme was ‘the year of order’. I wanted to put systems in place for my life and my business and to feel calmer and more peaceful by the end of the year. I wanted, if it was at all possible, to feel a little more under control.

That’s been a really good direction for this year. I’ve experimented with various ways of organising things and put a few new things into practice. And yes, I think that I feel just a little more under control now than I did in January. 

Now you may be wondering why I’m bringing this up now, rather than in the new year when everyone is making resolutions. 

The thing is, I think that a year theme requires a little thought. A little mulling over.

I mean, it’s something you are aiming to hang on to and work towards for a whole year (mostly – sometimes more, sometimes less). You don’t want to make that decision on January 1, when you’re exhausted from the party and fireworks the night before. You want to have a theme that actually relates to your life and the direction you’re going.

So today I thought I’d give you a couple of tools to help you look over the year that’s been, and think about what direction you’d like for the year ahead.

One tool is something I’ve pulled from Daniel Sih’s book Space Maker and the same idea got sent to me by a friend. It’s an activity I did while I was recently away on my retreat and it involves post-it notes.

Post it notes, coloured pens and highlighters
Photo by Frans Van Heerden from Pexels

To start with, you take your post-its and you brainstorm, writing down the significant people, places and events in your life from the past few years (or even over your whole life). You write one idea on each sticky note. These are things that have happened to you, or things you have done. Good things and bad things. Things that have shaped you. I wrote down events like the publication of my books, jobs gained and lost, my thyroid illness, moving house. Just write anything that you see as significant.

You then arrange these sticky notes in a logical sequence – a chronological sequence, or maybe in life stages, or any order or set of segments that seems right to you. I arranged mine in clumps according to approximately when they happened.

You can use a different colour of sticky note for the painful or bad things that have happened so that the good happenings stand out a bit from the bad ones.

When you look at this sequence, you can start to see patterns. You can see how your life has been tracking. You can see how God has been transforming you, and how he has used different situations in your life to bring you to who you are now.

From there, you can dream about the future more effectively. Sih recommends that you write your dreams and ideas for the future on more sticky notes. Once again, just brainstorm. There are no wrong answers here. 

This will give you direction, and from that direction you can put together some goals, and maybe even a year theme for next year.

Another activity you can do with these sticky notes is to write a story – your story. You don’t have to worry about getting the chronology correct in this story, or even to have all the details in there. But you can write about the significant times in your life. You can think of yourself as the main character and write how these times changed your direction, or helped you to grow. How you made key decisions or gained key insights. 

Again, this gives you some idea of where you’ve been and where you are going. It helps you to see the next step on your journey.

Alternatively you can review or reflect on specific areas of life. The areas I’ve noted below were shared with me by a friend who does this mapping exercise once a year. She says that it helps her to discern what’s next in the Lord’s plan for her future. And I think these are excellent questions to ask ourselves. I’ll be spending some time with them in the next month too.

Broadly we want to review:

Relationships. Are there specific relationships that are life-giving right now? Are there relationships that are draining? Is there something you can do to change or help with those relationships? (For example, visiting a particularly draining person with a friend.)

Serving opportunities. What serving positions is it time to let go of? What positions would you like to take up? Is it time to take up a position on a committee or a board? Is it time to stop helping out on a particular roster or being part of a particular group?

Significant projects. How many projects are too many? Are there projects you’ve been hanging on to that really need to be dropped in the coming year? Is there something you’ve been thinking about that you’d like to take up?

Self-care. Now is the time to book in holidays for the coming year. To book in intentional time with God, with family, with yourself, or with a significant other. This doesn’t have to be expensive. You can have a retreat at home or negotiate to use a friend’s place. And remember those Sabbath days once a week too.

And finally, is there something  new you want to take up. Is this year the year to branch out to a new idea or hobby or ministry?

Another podcast on this kind of thing used these six categories. (I wish I could tell you which podcast, but at the time of listening, I just noted the categories on a sticky note and kept moving.)

The categories are:

  • Work/vocation
  • Health and wellness
  • Relationships
  • Community 
  • Money 
  • Home

Some of these categories overlap with those above, which makes sense. Our lives are made up of these things. I’m not really coming up with some stunning new way to look at life. I’m just suggesting that we be a bit intentional about actually doing it. Whatever the categories you use, I suggest that you brainstorm what you have in each category now, and then really look at those things and see if they fit into what you want your life to be in the future.

As we look into the future, it can be helpful to look beyond just the next year. I guess this is why all interviewers ask you to tell them your five-year plan. Michael Lindsay in his book Hinge Moments quotes Dave Evans, the EA of Design Thinking at Stanford. He says that you should have not one, but three five-year plans.

The first is a plan for where you’ll be in five years if you keep following the path you’re on now.

The second, is a plan for if you take a sharp right turn – a job that’s related to what you’re doing now, but in a different direction.

And the third, is for if you do something wild. If time and money were no object and you knew you wouldn’t fail. What would your five year plan be then?

Having these three in your mind will help you to make decisions as opportunities present themselves. They’ll help you see opportunities that you didn’t know were there before.

So you can see that there’s lots to think about and mull over. I hope that you can make time to stay intentional about your life, even as the Christmas rush starts. And if you can’t even think about things like this right now, I hope that this blog will give you a head start on your January thinking. I hope and pray that it is helpful to you. And if you think it will be helpful for someone else, feel free to share this blog (or, if they prefer listening, let them know about the podcast).

Endings and New Beginnings

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The new bass. I have no idea what I’m doing 🙂

Moz has been working on a very exciting project lately.

He has been making a bass guitar.

This guitar is a thing of beauty.  It is made to match my little green mini and it even has racing stripes.

But the bass didn’t start out that beautiful.

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The kit form guitar.

It came in a kit. It needed to be shaped and sanded. The sanding process seemed endless but all of the imperfections had to be removed before one coat of paint was added.

We had to try various colours of green to find the one we liked the best. Then each coat had to dry for a bit, before more sanding and another coat. And then more sanding and a clear coat. And then the polishing process started to bring up that beautiful shine.

The racing stripes had to be designed, the laminate chosen, and the Moz logo developed and added. The neck was oiled to bring out the beauty in the wood, filling the house with all sorts of strange odours.

And after all that, that’s when things started to get technical!

The neck had to be at the right angle. The frets ground down to be the right height, the little black bit at the top of the fret board had to be filed half a millimetre or so, so that the strings rested in just the right way to make it easy to play. Everything had to be the right height and strength and tension.

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The paint is finished and the strings are on, but we’re not finished yet!

But that wasn’t enough. The electronics needed to be completed too. Copper shielding was placed in the hole on the side. Wires were soldered. Sound was checked.

Finally the bass was declared finished. A thing of beauty. And of fun. And something that we’re all going to enjoy playing and messing around on over the next months and years.

In one way, this project is over, and there’s a little sadness there. It’s been a fun project for Moz to play with and he’ll need to find another one now.

But in another way, the project is just beginning.

Moz has been working on another project too.

For the last six years he has been Head of Year to a year group at the school where he works. The kids started out as little grade sevens, and now they have finished grade twelve. They are adults. They have their leavers dinner tonight.

It’s another bitter-sweet moment, an ending and a beginning. I pray that their lives are instruments that bring great joy to others, and to God, in the music that they play wherever they find their lives heading.

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